Thursday, April 4, 2013

NRDC Announces Winners of the 2013 Growing Green Awards

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) celebrates four remarkable food vanguards for their pioneering efforts to create healthier and more sustainable food systems at the fifth annual Growing Green Awards. The winners, who are leaders in tackling antibiotic resistance on farms, infusing urban areas with fresh produce in corner stores, championing business innovation in organic agriculture and empowering communities with sustainable food equity projects, will be honored this evening at the City View at Metreon in San Francisco. 

Food Producer: Russ Kremer

Food Justice Leader: Tezozomac

Young Food Leader: Brianna Almaguer-Sandoval

Business Leader: Larry Jacobs

To learn more about their wonderful accomplishments, visit: www.nrdc.org/health/growinggreen.asp

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Check out some highlights from the TEDxManhattan, “Changing the Way We Eat” featuring NRDC’s Peter Lehner. For more information on your food, visit http://www.nrdc.org/food/

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Sasha Lyutse, NRDC policy analyst, and her friends experiment with Frugal Feasts—healthy, responsibly-sourced meals prepared for no more than $5 bucks a person. Read more about their latest feasts (including recipes) in her Switchboard blog.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

This video shows the making of Tia Magallon’s cover image for the Fall 2012 issue of OnEarth Magazine. 

The feature story, Fresh Food for All by Elizabeth Royte, is about how our eating choices — what we buy, where we buy it, how much it costs — are largely dictated by monolithic, heavily subsidized agribusiness concerns. Producers of local food, meanwhile, have struggled to connect to a mass market. Now, in New York City, the rudiments of a new and healthier food system may be emerging.  Read the story.

Friday, August 31, 2012
Food is simply too good to waste. Even the most sustainably farmed food does us no good if the food is never eaten. Getting food to our tables eats up 10 percent of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50 percent of U.S. land, and swallows 80 percent of freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet, 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. That is more than 20 pounds of food per person every month. Not only does this mean that Americans are throwing out the equivalent of $165 billion each year, but also 25 percent of all freshwater and huge amounts of unnecessary chemicals, energy, and land. Moreover, almost all of that uneaten food ends up rotting in landfills where it accounts for almost 25 percent of U.S. methane emissions.
Nutrition is also lost in the mix — food saved by reducing losses by just 15 percent could feed more than 25 million Americans every year at a time when one in six Americans lack a secure supply of food to their tables. Read more: Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to LandfillChart source: Food and Agriculture Organization 2011

Food is simply too good to waste. Even the most sustainably farmed food does us no good if the food is never eaten. Getting food to our tables eats up 10 percent of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50 percent of U.S. land, and swallows 80 percent of freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet, 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. That is more than 20 pounds of food per person every month. Not only does this mean that Americans are throwing out the equivalent of $165 billion each year, but also 25 percent of all freshwater and huge amounts of unnecessary chemicals, energy, and land. Moreover, almost all of that uneaten food ends up rotting in landfills where it accounts for almost 25 percent of U.S. methane emissions.

Nutrition is also lost in the mix — food saved by reducing losses by just 15 percent could feed more than 25 million Americans every year at a time when one in six Americans lack a secure supply of food to their tables.

Read more: Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill

Chart source: Food and Agriculture Organization 2011