Thursday, February 21, 2013

Check out some highlights from the TEDxManhattan, “Changing the Way We Eat” featuring NRDC’s Peter Lehner. For more information on your food, visit http://www.nrdc.org/food/

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Sasha Lyutse, NRDC policy analyst, and her friends experiment with Frugal Feasts—healthy, responsibly-sourced meals prepared for no more than $5 bucks a person. Read more about their latest feasts (including recipes) in her Switchboard blog.

Monday, August 20, 2012
What We Eat Matters for the Climate According to the United Nations, the global livestock industry is responsible for roughly 18 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions (includes emissions resulting from related deforestation). Livestock consume more than half of the grain produced in the United States and clearing space for grazing is a leading cause of deforestation in the developing world. Ruminant mammals (cows, sheep, and goats) emit large quantities of methane in digestion, a greenhouse gas 23 times more potent than carbon dioxide, and the nitrogenous fertilizers used to grow livestock feed crops emit high quantities of nitrous oxide, a gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide. A recent study suggested that the environmental impact of red meat production is so significant that dropping red meat one day per week would reduce greenhouse gas emissions as much as consuming only locally-grown products all week—a staggering figure considering that the average distance our food travels from farm to fork is approximately 1,500 miles.
Read more: Simple and Inexpensive Actions Could Reduce Global Warming Emissions by One Billion Tons

What We Eat Matters for the Climate
According to the United Nations, the global livestock industry is responsible for roughly 18 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions (includes emissions resulting from related deforestation). Livestock consume more than half of the grain produced in the United States and clearing space for grazing is a leading cause of deforestation in the developing world. Ruminant mammals (cows, sheep, and goats) emit large quantities of methane in digestion, a greenhouse gas 23 times more potent than carbon dioxide, and the nitrogenous fertilizers used to grow livestock feed crops emit high quantities of nitrous oxide, a gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

A recent study suggested that the environmental impact of red meat production is so significant that dropping red meat one day per week would reduce greenhouse gas emissions as much as consuming only locally-grown products all week—a staggering figure considering that the average distance our food travels from farm to fork is approximately 1,500 miles.

Read more: Simple and Inexpensive Actions Could Reduce Global Warming Emissions by One Billion Tons

Saturday, August 4, 2012
Choose Safe, Sustainable SeafoodSmaller fish that are lower on the food chain, herbivorous fish in particular, tend to be plentiful and better for your health because they contain less mercury. And they offer plenty of great options for grilling, whether squid, macke rel, catfish, sardines, or barrimundi. For recipes, check out NRDC’s Sustainable Seafood Guide – try the “Fish Tacos with Grilled Corn,” a mouthwatering South-of-the-Border take on grilling. This guide also provides questions to ask when purchasing any of the five most popular five in the United States, including shrimp, salmon, tilapia, pollock and canned tuna, as well as a shopping guide, a list of higher and lower mercury fish, and information about sustainable fishing.
If you can purchase seafood from a Marine Stewardship Council-certified fishery, do so; MSC certification is rigorous and not easily awarded. EcoFish and Wild Planet Foods are retailers that only sell sustainable seafood products, and can ship them directly to you if there isn’t a nearby store that sells the same product.
Where those options aren’t available, seek out fish caught locally in preference to those caught outside the United States. American seafood isn’t perfect, but the U.S. variety of a particular type of fish is generally better than its imported counterpart because this country has stricter fishing and farming standards than do other parts of the world.
Read more: The Omnivore’s Green Grill
Photo: Another Pint Please/Flickr

Choose Safe, Sustainable Seafood
Smaller fish that are lower on the food chain, herbivorous fish in particular, tend to be plentiful and better for your health because they contain less mercury. And they offer plenty of great options for grilling, whether squid, macke rel, catfish, sardines, or barrimundi. For recipes, check out NRDC’s Sustainable Seafood Guide – try the “Fish Tacos with Grilled Corn,” a mouthwatering South-of-the-Border take on grilling. This guide also provides questions to ask when purchasing any of the five most popular five in the United States, including shrimp, salmon, tilapia, pollock and canned tuna, as well as a shopping guide, a list of higher and lower mercury fish, and information about sustainable fishing.

If you can purchase seafood from a Marine Stewardship Council-certified fishery, do so; MSC certification is rigorous and not easily awarded. EcoFish and Wild Planet Foods are retailers that only sell sustainable seafood products, and can ship them directly to you if there isn’t a nearby store that sells the same product.

Where those options aren’t available, seek out fish caught locally in preference to those caught outside the United States. American seafood isn’t perfect, but the U.S. variety of a particular type of fish is generally better than its imported counterpart because this country has stricter fishing and farming standards than do other parts of the world.

Read more: The Omnivore’s Green Grill

Photo: Another Pint Please/Flickr

Monday, July 30, 2012
According to estimates by the Humane Society of the United States, if every American embraced Meatless Mondays, we would need to raise 1.4 billion fewer farm animals. That translates into a lot fewer toxic chemicals, reduced climate pollution, healthier soils and waterways, and a lot less animal cruelty. Sasha Lyutse, NRDC Policy Analyst, in this blog post: Eat your vegetables. No, wait, don’t. USDA publicly kowtows to Beef Association.