Thursday, September 19, 2013
Our resident storyteller/scribe extraordinaire, Perrin Ireland, sits down with Ted Labuza, Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of Food Science and Engineering at University of Minnesota, to discuss food rot and waste. Click here to read the full article on Scientific American.    

Our resident storyteller/scribe extraordinaire, Perrin Ireland, sits down with Ted Labuza, Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of Food Science and Engineering at University of Minnesota, to discuss food rot and waste. Click here to read the full article on Scientific American.    

Wednesday, September 18, 2013
NRDC’s Perrin Ireland sits down with Emily Broad Lieb, who directs the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic and Dana Gunders, NRDC’s resident scientist to discuss food waste. Click here to learn more!

NRDC’s Perrin Ireland sits down with Emily Broad Lieb, who directs the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic and Dana Gunders, NRDC’s resident scientist to discuss food waste. Click here to learn more!

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Check out some highlights from the TEDxManhattan, “Changing the Way We Eat” featuring NRDC’s Peter Lehner. For more information on your food, visit http://www.nrdc.org/food/

Thursday, January 3, 2013
Shop Wisely—Plan meals, use shopping lists, buy from bulk bins, and avoid impulse buys. Don’t succumb to marketing tricks that lead you to buy more food than you need, particularly for perishable items. Though these may be less expensive per ounce, they can be more expensive overall if much of that food is discarded.
Buy Funny Fruit—Many fruits and vegetables are thrown out because their size, shape, or color are not “right”. Buying these perfectly good funny fruit, at the farmer’s market or elsewhere, utilizes food that might otherwise go to waste.
Learn When Food Goes Bad—“Sell-by” and “use-by” dates are not federally regulated and do not indicate safety, except on certain baby foods. Rather, they are manufacturer suggestions for peak quality. Most foods can be safely consumed well after their use-by dates.15
Mine Your Fridge—Websites such as www.lovefoodhatewaste.com can help you get creative with recipes to use up anything that might go bad soon.
Use Your Freezer—Frozen foods remain safe indefinitely. Freeze fresh produce and leftovers if you won’t have the chance to eat them before they go bad.
Request Smaller Portions—Restaurants will often provide half-portions upon request at reduced prices.
Eat Leftovers—Ask your restaurant to pack up your extras so you can eat them later. Freeze them if you don’t want to eat immediately. Only about half of Americans take leftovers home from restaurants.
Compost—Composting food scraps can reduce their climate impact while also recycling their nutrients.
Donate—Non-perishable and unspoiled perishable food can be donated to local food banks, soup kitchens, pantries, and shelters. Local and national programs frequently offer free pick-up and provide reusable containers to donors.
Read more: NRDC’s Food Waste Fact Sheet

Shop Wisely—Plan meals, use shopping lists, buy from bulk bins, and avoid impulse buys. Don’t succumb to marketing tricks that lead you to buy more food than you need, particularly for perishable items. Though these may be less expensive per ounce, they can be more expensive overall if much of that food is discarded.

Buy Funny Fruit—Many fruits and vegetables are thrown out because their size, shape, or color are not “right”. Buying these perfectly good funny fruit, at the farmer’s market or elsewhere, utilizes food that might otherwise go to waste.

Learn When Food Goes Bad—“Sell-by” and “use-by” dates are not federally regulated and do not indicate safety, except on certain baby foods. Rather, they are manufacturer suggestions for peak quality. Most foods can be safely consumed well after their use-by dates.15

Mine Your Fridge—Websites such as www.lovefoodhatewaste.com can help you get creative with recipes to use up anything that might go bad soon.

Use Your Freezer—Frozen foods remain safe indefinitely. Freeze fresh produce and leftovers if you won’t have the chance to eat them before they go bad.

Request Smaller Portions—Restaurants will often provide half-portions upon request at reduced prices.

Eat Leftovers—Ask your restaurant to pack up your extras so you can eat them later. Freeze them if you don’t want to eat immediately. Only about half of Americans take leftovers home from restaurants.

Compost—Composting food scraps can reduce their climate impact while also recycling their nutrients.

Donate—Non-perishable and unspoiled perishable food can be donated to local food banks, soup kitchens, pantries, and shelters. Local and national programs frequently offer free pick-up and provide reusable containers to donors.

Read more: NRDC’s Food Waste Fact Sheet

Saturday, November 17, 2012
This Thanksgiving, Be More Grateful than Wasteful"We feast to celebrate that our ancestors had enough food to survive their first winter, acknowledging that once upon a time food was something to be grateful for.  Then the next day, we throw half of it away." - Dana Gunders, NRDC project scientist. Read more.
Photo: Pixelden via flickr

This Thanksgiving, Be More Grateful than Wasteful

"We feast to celebrate that our ancestors had enough food to survive their first winter, acknowledging that once upon a time food was something to be grateful for.  Then the next day, we throw half of it away." - Dana Gunders, NRDC project scientist.
Read more.

Photo: Pixelden via flickr