Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Americans, on average, throw away about 23 pounds of perfectly edible food, per person, every month.

A few simple guidelines can help you save money and cut down on the amount of food that’s wasted at home.

  1. Plan your meals for the week, and then buy only what you plan to cook.
  2. Make a shopping list, and stick to it.
  3. Check your cupboards before you go to the store, to avoid buying doubles.
  4. Understand that for many products, the “use by” and “best before” dates are simply manufacturer recommendations for peak quality, and are not an indicator of food safety. Very often foods—particularly dry goods—are fine long after the date on the package.  Trust your nose and common sense.

Read more: Tackling Food Waste at Home

Friday, August 31, 2012
Food is simply too good to waste. Even the most sustainably farmed food does us no good if the food is never eaten. Getting food to our tables eats up 10 percent of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50 percent of U.S. land, and swallows 80 percent of freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet, 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. That is more than 20 pounds of food per person every month. Not only does this mean that Americans are throwing out the equivalent of $165 billion each year, but also 25 percent of all freshwater and huge amounts of unnecessary chemicals, energy, and land. Moreover, almost all of that uneaten food ends up rotting in landfills where it accounts for almost 25 percent of U.S. methane emissions.
Nutrition is also lost in the mix — food saved by reducing losses by just 15 percent could feed more than 25 million Americans every year at a time when one in six Americans lack a secure supply of food to their tables. Read more: Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to LandfillChart source: Food and Agriculture Organization 2011

Food is simply too good to waste. Even the most sustainably farmed food does us no good if the food is never eaten. Getting food to our tables eats up 10 percent of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50 percent of U.S. land, and swallows 80 percent of freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet, 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. That is more than 20 pounds of food per person every month. Not only does this mean that Americans are throwing out the equivalent of $165 billion each year, but also 25 percent of all freshwater and huge amounts of unnecessary chemicals, energy, and land. Moreover, almost all of that uneaten food ends up rotting in landfills where it accounts for almost 25 percent of U.S. methane emissions.

Nutrition is also lost in the mix — food saved by reducing losses by just 15 percent could feed more than 25 million Americans every year at a time when one in six Americans lack a secure supply of food to their tables.

Read more: Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill

Chart source: Food and Agriculture Organization 2011

Sunday, July 22, 2012
Oceans of Garbage - Why People Are Eating Their Own TrashFrancesca Koe, director of special projects at NRDC, recommends this graphic created by students at MastersDegree.net. Read more in her blog.

Oceans of Garbage - Why People Are Eating Their Own Trash
Francesca Koe, director of special projects at NRDC, recommends this graphic created by students at MastersDegree.net. Read more in her blog.

Friday, July 20, 2012
Debris from Japan’s Tsunami: Some Helpful Info Courtesy of NOAAThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program has provided the public with a number of educational resources regarding ocean-borne wreckage from the Japanese tsunami that might reach U.S. shores. As a result of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011, large amounts of debris were washed back into the ocean as the tsunami retreated. NOAA expects some portion of this material will reach U.S. and Canadian shores over a period of several years. Some debris has already arrived and, according to NOAA models, likely began to be washed up on the U.S. West coast during the winter of 2011-2012.  Read more.
Graphic: NOAA Marine Debris Program

Debris from Japan’s Tsunami: Some Helpful Info Courtesy of NOAA
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program has provided the public with a number of educational resources regarding ocean-borne wreckage from the Japanese tsunami that might reach U.S. shores. As a result of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011, large amounts of debris were washed back into the ocean as the tsunami retreated. NOAA expects some portion of this material will reach U.S. and Canadian shores over a period of several years. Some debris has already arrived and, according to NOAA models, likely began to be washed up on the U.S. West coast during the winter of 2011-2012.  Read more.

Graphic: NOAA Marine Debris Program

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
About 1 million tons of CO2, 95 billion gallons of water, and $275 million will be thrown away this Thanksgiving in the form of leftover turkey. Please eat your leftovers this holiday season. (via NRDC’s Switchboard blog.)