Thursday, September 26, 2013
"In short, don’t believe the industry spin: the tar sands industry and the Canadian government are failing to manage water resources responsibly. It is critical that the United States see through the greenwashing efforts of the tar sands industry and the Canadian government and reject the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. Approving Keystone XL or other tar sands pipelines would make the United States complicit in these unsustainable water withdrawals and the reckless spewing of toxic pollutants into the Athabasca River and watershed." - Elizabeth Shope, NRDC. Read more on this here.

 

"In short, don’t believe the industry spin: the tar sands industry and the Canadian government are failing to manage water resources responsibly. It is critical that the United States see through the greenwashing efforts of the tar sands industry and the Canadian government and reject the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. Approving Keystone XL or other tar sands pipelines would make the United States complicit in these unsustainable water withdrawals and the reckless spewing of toxic pollutants into the Athabasca River and watershed." - Elizabeth Shope, NRDC. Read more on this here.

 

Friday, February 1, 2013

Join us in D.C. for the largest climate rally in U.S. history!

On February 17, 2013, NRDC, Sierra Club, 350.org and partners will be leading the “Forward on Climate” rally in DC to call on President Obama to reject the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline and set carbon standards for dirty power plants!

Watch this video on the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline and march with us on February 17 – sign-up today!

Sunday, November 4, 2012
TransCanada’s record presents a strong case for rejecting Keystone XL tar sands pipeline (again)
The Keystone XL tar sands pipeline raises a variety of complex and significant issues, including the environmental impact of tar sands development, the risks associated with transporting it and the greater impact of tar sands spills. However TransCanada’s performance over the last few years introduces a much simpler question – should we trust this company to build and operate any kind of pipeline, anywhere?  Read more.
Photo: TransCanada’s Bison Pipeline Explosion, July 20, 2011

TransCanada’s record presents a strong case for rejecting Keystone XL tar sands pipeline (again)

The Keystone XL tar sands pipeline raises a variety of complex and significant issues, including the environmental impact of tar sands development, the risks associated with transporting it and the greater impact of tar sands spills. However TransCanada’s performance over the last few years introduces a much simpler question – should we trust this company to build and operate any kind of pipeline, anywhere?  Read more.

Photo: TransCanada’s Bison Pipeline Explosion, July 20, 2011

Monday, September 24, 2012
Pipeline leak detection systems miss 19 out of 20 spillsAn investigation of pipeline accident reports from the last ten years has revealed that the much touted leak detection systems employed by pipeline companies only catch one out of twenty spills. The InsideClimate New article by Lisa Song illustrates an alarming disconnect between industry rhetoric and reality when it comes to detecting leaks on pipelines. Not only do pipeline leak detection systems miss nineteen out of twenty spills, they miss four out of five spills larger than 42,000 gallons. Understanding the limits of current leak detection technology has never been more important. As companies like Enbridge and TransCanada propose pipelines moving large volumes of tar sands across sparely populated areas, through rivers and aquifers, it’s critical that the public consider what’s at stake with open eyes. Particularly after learning from Enbridge’s Kalamazoo tar sands pipeline spill how much more damaging tar sands can be.  Read more.
Photo of Kalamazoo River cleanup, courtesy of Mic Stolz

Pipeline leak detection systems miss 19 out of 20 spills
An investigation of pipeline accident reports from the last ten years has revealed that the much touted leak detection systems employed by pipeline companies only catch one out of twenty spills. The InsideClimate New article by Lisa Song illustrates an alarming disconnect between industry rhetoric and reality when it comes to detecting leaks on pipelines. Not only do pipeline leak detection systems miss nineteen out of twenty spills, they miss four out of five spills larger than 42,000 gallons. Understanding the limits of current leak detection technology has never been more important.

As companies like Enbridge and TransCanada propose pipelines moving large volumes of tar sands across sparely populated areas, through rivers and aquifers, it’s critical that the public consider what’s at stake with open eyes. Particularly after learning from Enbridge’s Kalamazoo tar sands pipeline spill how much more damaging tar sands can be.  Read more.

Photo of Kalamazoo River cleanup, courtesy of Mic Stolz

Sunday, July 8, 2012

Bob Bandaret, a farmer near Cogswell, ND, describes the tar sands blowout he witnessed near his land in 2011.

The tar sands blowout that Banderet witnessed is particularly relevant today, as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has just given TransCanada the green light to begin construction of portions of the “southern leg” of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline to the Gulf, where much of the heavy crude will be refined and exported.

Voices Against Tar Sands is a website devoted to people’s stories about the fight against  dangerous tar sands oil mining and pipeline projects in North America. 

(Source: switchboard.nrdc.org)