Thursday, November 15, 2012
Growing Green Awards2013 Awards Honor Extraordinary Leadership in Sustainable Food
Nominations are due by December 7, 2012
$10,000 cash prize in the Food Producer category
$2,500 cash prize in the Food Justice Leader category
$2,500 cash prize in the Young Food Leader category
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) announces its fifth annual Growing Green Awards to recognize individuals who have demonstrated original leadership in the field of sustainable food. Through this national award, NRDC will recognize extraordinary contributions that advance ecologically-integrated farming practices, climate stewardship, water stewardship, farmland preservation, and social responsibility from farm to fork.
A 2013 Growing Green Award will be given to an outstanding individual in each of the following four categories: Food Producer, Business Leader, Food Justice Leader, and Young Food Leader. Cash prizes of $10,000, $2,500 and $2,500 will be awarded in the Food Producer, Food Justice Leader and Young Food Leader categories, respectively, and all winners will be widely celebrated through outreach to media and NRDC’s networks. Winners will also be celebrated in the spring of 2013 at an event to benefit NRDC in San Francisco. Winners will be chosen by an independent panel of nationally renowned sustainable food thought-leaders.
Read more and apply!

Growing Green Awards
2013 Awards Honor Extraordinary Leadership in Sustainable Food

Nominations are due by December 7, 2012

  • $10,000 cash prize in the Food Producer category
  • $2,500 cash prize in the Food Justice Leader category
  • $2,500 cash prize in the Young Food Leader category

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) announces its fifth annual Growing Green Awards to recognize individuals who have demonstrated original leadership in the field of sustainable food. Through this national award, NRDC will recognize extraordinary contributions that advance ecologically-integrated farming practices, climate stewardship, water stewardship, farmland preservation, and social responsibility from farm to fork.

A 2013 Growing Green Award will be given to an outstanding individual in each of the following four categories: Food Producer, Business Leader, Food Justice Leader, and Young Food Leader. Cash prizes of $10,000, $2,500 and $2,500 will be awarded in the Food Producer, Food Justice Leader and Young Food Leader categories, respectively, and all winners will be widely celebrated through outreach to media and NRDC’s networks. Winners will also be celebrated in the spring of 2013 at an event to benefit NRDC in San Francisco. Winners will be chosen by an independent panel of nationally renowned sustainable food thought-leaders.

Read more and apply!

Thursday, April 26, 2012
Choose Organic Produce Where It Matters Most
Here are some ways to stay within your budget while significantly reducing your pesticide load:
Choose organic where it counts, such as when purchasing apples, bell peppers, carrots, celery, cherries, grapes (imported), kale, lettuce, nectarines, peaches, pears, potatoes, strawberries, and sweet peppers, whose conventionally grown versions contain the most pesticides. (Source: EWG)
Know when you can skip organic. While there are many reasons to buy organic foods, not everyone can find fresh organic produce at their supermarket, or afford the premium price tags. Certain fruits and vegetables are very low in pesticide residues so buying organic isn’t as important. Some examples include: asparagus, avocados, onions, sweet corn, pineapple, mango and grapefruit.
Choose low-fat organic or grass-fed milk and meat. Toxins tend to accumulate in animal fat.
Wash all produce. Washing helps remove pesticides and bacteria introduced during handling and shipping.
Steam leafy greens. Cooking vastly reduces pesticides and E. coli and retains most nutrients.
Peel carrots, cucumbers, etc. This won’t get at the systemic pesticides that are inside, but it will remove any that are on or in the skin.
Buy local. Regional farms serving local markets can skip the harsh chemicals that are used on crops intended for distant markets. Local Harvest makes it easy to find local food outlets in your area.
Buy frozen. Flash-freezing locks in nutrients. Use Local Harvest to find stores that sell frozen organic produce grown in your region.
Make more meals from scratch using fresh, whole, local ingredients. You’ll save money and avoid not only pesticides but also unhealthy additives like sugar, salt and fat.
Read more.photo: Lisa Beebe

Choose Organic Produce Where It Matters Most

Here are some ways to stay within your budget while significantly reducing your pesticide load:

  • Choose organic where it counts, such as when purchasing apples, bell peppers, carrots, celery, cherries, grapes (imported), kale, lettuce, nectarines, peaches, pears, potatoes, strawberries, and sweet peppers, whose conventionally grown versions contain the most pesticides. (Source: EWG)
  • Know when you can skip organic. While there are many reasons to buy organic foods, not everyone can find fresh organic produce at their supermarket, or afford the premium price tags. Certain fruits and vegetables are very low in pesticide residues so buying organic isn’t as important. Some examples include: asparagus, avocados, onions, sweet corn, pineapple, mango and grapefruit.
  • Choose low-fat organic or grass-fed milk and meat. Toxins tend to accumulate in animal fat.
  • Wash all produce. Washing helps remove pesticides and bacteria introduced during handling and shipping.
  • Steam leafy greens. Cooking vastly reduces pesticides and E. coli and retains most nutrients.
  • Peel carrots, cucumbers, etc. This won’t get at the systemic pesticides that are inside, but it will remove any that are on or in the skin.
  • Buy local. Regional farms serving local markets can skip the harsh chemicals that are used on crops intended for distant markets. Local Harvest makes it easy to find local food outlets in your area.
  • Buy frozen. Flash-freezing locks in nutrients. Use Local Harvest to find stores that sell frozen organic produce grown in your region.
  • Make more meals from scratch using fresh, whole, local ingredients. You’ll save money and avoid not only pesticides but also unhealthy additives like sugar, salt and fat.

Read more.

photo: Lisa Beebe

Friday, March 16, 2012
Easy Organic Lawn Care: A Quick 4-Step Guide to a Healthier Lawn
How about growing an organic lawn this year?  Organic yard care is simple once you go through the steps of disconnecting your lawn from its chemical life-support system. Read more.
photo: Lisa Beebe

Easy Organic Lawn Care: A Quick 4-Step Guide to a Healthier Lawn

How about growing an organic lawn this year?  Organic yard care is simple once you go through the steps of disconnecting your lawn from its chemical life-support system. Read more.

photo: Lisa Beebe

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Spring is around the corner! If you’re thinking about starting a garden this year,  check out:
Back to the Garden: Ready, Set, Seed! Paige Smith Orloff’s tips on starting your garden from seed (via OnEarth magazine)Start Your Gardens: NRDC’s guide to growing fresh, organic produce at home.
photo: Chiot’s Run/flickr

Spring is around the corner! If you’re thinking about starting a garden this year,  check out:

Back to the Garden: Ready, Set, Seed! Paige Smith Orloff’s tips on starting your garden from seed (via OnEarth magazine)
Start Your Gardens: NRDC’s guide to growing fresh, organic produce at home.

photo: Chiot’s Run/flickr

Friday, December 30, 2011
Celebrate the New Year with Organic Spirits. Organic distillers use organic grains, such as wheat, rye or corn, to  make alcohol. The payoff for consumers is in the support of  earth-friendly farming practices—any chemical or pesticide residue  would be removed in the distilling process anyway. “You would have to  have a superhuman palate to notice a taste difference,” says Paul Abercrombie, author of Organic, Shaken and Stirred. “But a distiller who’s taking the trouble to make an  organic spirit is someone who’s interested in a high quality product.”  Read more.Photo: Kirti Poddar/Flickr

Celebrate the New Year with Organic Spirits.
Organic distillers use organic grains, such as wheat, rye or corn, to make alcohol. The payoff for consumers is in the support of earth-friendly farming practices—any chemical or pesticide residue would be removed in the distilling process anyway. “You would have to have a superhuman palate to notice a taste difference,” says Paul Abercrombie, author of Organic, Shaken and Stirred. “But a distiller who’s taking the trouble to make an organic spirit is someone who’s interested in a high quality product.”  Read more.

Photo: Kirti Poddar/Flickr