Friday, August 24, 2012
Turning the Tide on Plastic Pollution With ArtAlthough single-use plastics are widely recognized as one of the largest threats to our oceans, plastic pollution is even more nefarious than what washes up on our beaches daily. Those tiny pieces of plastic that you see on your trip to the shore this summer are sadly a symptom of a much larger problem. The bulk of the plastic debris in our oceans accumulates not on the beaches, where it is easily seen, but in giant “garbage patches,” floating like minestrone soup thousands of miles off of our coasts. Suspended particles in the sea create a recipe for disaster harming animals and poisoning the food chain as a deadly “plastic soup.”Read more in Francesca Koe’s post about artists who are turning the tragedy of marine plastic pollution into compelling works of art.

Turning the Tide on Plastic Pollution With Art
Although single-use plastics are widely recognized as one of the largest threats to our oceans, plastic pollution is even more nefarious than what washes up on our beaches daily. Those tiny pieces of plastic that you see on your trip to the shore this summer are sadly a symptom of a much larger problem. The bulk of the plastic debris in our oceans accumulates not on the beaches, where it is easily seen, but in giant “garbage patches,” floating like minestrone soup thousands of miles off of our coasts. Suspended particles in the sea create a recipe for disaster harming animals and poisoning the food chain as a deadly “plastic soup.”

Read more in Francesca Koe’s post about artists who are turning the tragedy of marine plastic pollution into compelling works of art.

Tuesday, August 7, 2012 Monday, June 18, 2012
Photo:Toxic pool of water outside Jardim Gramacho, Rio’s largest dump. At Rio’s Giant Trash Dump, Protecting People and Oceans AlikeWhat we do on land dramatically affects the health of our oceans.  There is no better example of that fact than Jardim Gramacho, one of the largest garbage dumps in the world, located in Rio de Janeiro and built on top of a mangrove forest.  Around the dump, impoverished Brazilians live, work and play in the discards of consumerism.  Toxic chemicals, fetid liquid, and a river of plastic trash all pollute the salt water around the mangroves, which eventually runs out to the sea. Read more.

Photo:Toxic pool of water outside Jardim Gramacho, Rio’s largest dump.

At Rio’s Giant Trash Dump, Protecting People and Oceans Alike
What we do on land dramatically affects the health of our oceans.  There is no better example of that fact than Jardim Gramacho, one of the largest garbage dumps in the world, located in Rio de Janeiro and built on top of a mangrove forest.  Around the dump, impoverished Brazilians live, work and play in the discards of consumerism.  Toxic chemicals, fetid liquid, and a river of plastic trash all pollute the salt water around the mangroves, which eventually runs out to the sea. Read more.

Monday, April 16, 2012

VIDEO: Spotlighting the Ocean’s Plastic Problem
Check out this new (very short) video by the Plastic Pollution Coalition.

Read more: Plastic Pollution in Our Oceans

(Source: onearth.org)

Tuesday, April 3, 2012
"BPA is a toxic chemical that has no place in our food supply. We believe FDA made the wrong call." - Dr. Sarah Janssen, senior scientist in NRDC’s public health program, responding to the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to allow bisphenol A (BPA) to remain in food packaging, an action that keeps the hormone-disrupting chemical linked to cancer, obesity and a host of other health problems in the food supply. Read more in this NRDC press release.
How to Avoid BPA:
Don’t use polycarbonate plastics (marked with a #7 PC) for storing food or beverages, especially if you are pregnant, nursing or the food or drink is for an infant or young child.
Avoid canned beverages, foods and soups, especially if pregnant or feeding young children. Choose frozen vegetables and soups and broth that come in glass jars or in aseptic “brick” cartons, as these containers are BPA-free.
Use a BPA-free reusable water bottle, such as an unlined stainless steel bottle.
Don’t allow your dentist to apply dental sealants made from BPA (or BADGE) to either yours or your child’s teeth. Ask your dentist to provide BPA-free treatments.
Read more about Bisphenol A.
Image: NIEHS

"BPA is a toxic chemical that has no place in our food supply. We believe FDA made the wrong call." - Dr. Sarah Janssen, senior scientist in NRDC’s public health program, responding to the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to allow bisphenol A (BPA) to remain in food packaging, an action that keeps the hormone-disrupting chemical linked to cancer, obesity and a host of other health problems in the food supply. Read more in this NRDC press release.

How to Avoid BPA:

  • Don’t use polycarbonate plastics (marked with a #7 PC) for storing food or beverages, especially if you are pregnant, nursing or the food or drink is for an infant or young child.
  • Avoid canned beverages, foods and soups, especially if pregnant or feeding young children. Choose frozen vegetables and soups and broth that come in glass jars or in aseptic “brick” cartons, as these containers are BPA-free.
  • Don’t allow your dentist to apply dental sealants made from BPA (or BADGE) to either yours or your child’s teeth. Ask your dentist to provide BPA-free treatments.

Read more about Bisphenol A.

Image: NIEHS