Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Toxic flame retardant chemicals are saturated in the foam inside our furniture. These chemicals are linked to serious health effects and are worthless in preventing furniture fires. We need better regulation of these chemicals to address this problem. If you agree, take action.

Thursday, November 29, 2012
Ever wondered what chemicals might lurk in your couch?  Sarah Janssen, NRDC senior scientist, explores flame retardant chemicals used in upholstered furniture and how they could be affecting your health in My Toxic Couch.

Ever wondered what chemicals might lurk in your couch?
Sarah Janssen, NRDC senior scientist, explores flame retardant chemicals used in upholstered furniture and how they could be affecting your health in My Toxic Couch.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011
letmypeopleshow:

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water:
As we rode out the storm in Long Beach, Long Island, the wind didn’t scare us, the rain was less than predicted, and the swell didn’t make it to our door. But we saw on the beach the next morning was terrifying: masses of toxic-looking foam rolling across the shore, covering sea and sand—and, for the unlucky in low-lying areas, cars and basements. Does anyone know what’s in this? On second thought, since we still plan to go swimming here, maybe we don’t want to know! 

You’re right to not want to know. It probably includes raw sewage. Nearly every time New York City gets heavy rain, untreated sewage is released into the rivers and bays. Stormwater runoff drains into the city’s combined sewer systems –  the same pipes and facilities that are also tasked with funneling  raw sewage to the city’s treatment plants. In heavy  rainstorms, the city’s aging sewer systems can no longer handle this  increased capacity of water to treat, so it’s discharged   into local waterways. There’s more info here.

letmypeopleshow:

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water:

As we rode out the storm in Long Beach, Long Island, the wind didn’t scare us, the rain was less than predicted, and the swell didn’t make it to our door. But we saw on the beach the next morning was terrifying: masses of toxic-looking foam rolling across the shore, covering sea and sand—and, for the unlucky in low-lying areas, cars and basements. Does anyone know what’s in this? On second thought, since we still plan to go swimming here, maybe we don’t want to know! 

You’re right to not want to know. It probably includes raw sewage. Nearly every time New York City gets heavy rain, untreated sewage is released into the rivers and bays. Stormwater runoff drains into the city’s combined sewer systems – the same pipes and facilities that are also tasked with funneling  raw sewage to the city’s treatment plants. In heavy rainstorms, the city’s aging sewer systems can no longer handle this increased capacity of water to treat, so it’s discharged  into local waterways. There’s more info here.