Friday, January 25, 2013 Thursday, January 3, 2013
Shop Wisely—Plan meals, use shopping lists, buy from bulk bins, and avoid impulse buys. Don’t succumb to marketing tricks that lead you to buy more food than you need, particularly for perishable items. Though these may be less expensive per ounce, they can be more expensive overall if much of that food is discarded.
Buy Funny Fruit—Many fruits and vegetables are thrown out because their size, shape, or color are not “right”. Buying these perfectly good funny fruit, at the farmer’s market or elsewhere, utilizes food that might otherwise go to waste.
Learn When Food Goes Bad—“Sell-by” and “use-by” dates are not federally regulated and do not indicate safety, except on certain baby foods. Rather, they are manufacturer suggestions for peak quality. Most foods can be safely consumed well after their use-by dates.15
Mine Your Fridge—Websites such as www.lovefoodhatewaste.com can help you get creative with recipes to use up anything that might go bad soon.
Use Your Freezer—Frozen foods remain safe indefinitely. Freeze fresh produce and leftovers if you won’t have the chance to eat them before they go bad.
Request Smaller Portions—Restaurants will often provide half-portions upon request at reduced prices.
Eat Leftovers—Ask your restaurant to pack up your extras so you can eat them later. Freeze them if you don’t want to eat immediately. Only about half of Americans take leftovers home from restaurants.
Compost—Composting food scraps can reduce their climate impact while also recycling their nutrients.
Donate—Non-perishable and unspoiled perishable food can be donated to local food banks, soup kitchens, pantries, and shelters. Local and national programs frequently offer free pick-up and provide reusable containers to donors.
Read more: NRDC’s Food Waste Fact Sheet

Shop Wisely—Plan meals, use shopping lists, buy from bulk bins, and avoid impulse buys. Don’t succumb to marketing tricks that lead you to buy more food than you need, particularly for perishable items. Though these may be less expensive per ounce, they can be more expensive overall if much of that food is discarded.

Buy Funny Fruit—Many fruits and vegetables are thrown out because their size, shape, or color are not “right”. Buying these perfectly good funny fruit, at the farmer’s market or elsewhere, utilizes food that might otherwise go to waste.

Learn When Food Goes Bad—“Sell-by” and “use-by” dates are not federally regulated and do not indicate safety, except on certain baby foods. Rather, they are manufacturer suggestions for peak quality. Most foods can be safely consumed well after their use-by dates.15

Mine Your Fridge—Websites such as www.lovefoodhatewaste.com can help you get creative with recipes to use up anything that might go bad soon.

Use Your Freezer—Frozen foods remain safe indefinitely. Freeze fresh produce and leftovers if you won’t have the chance to eat them before they go bad.

Request Smaller Portions—Restaurants will often provide half-portions upon request at reduced prices.

Eat Leftovers—Ask your restaurant to pack up your extras so you can eat them later. Freeze them if you don’t want to eat immediately. Only about half of Americans take leftovers home from restaurants.

Compost—Composting food scraps can reduce their climate impact while also recycling their nutrients.

Donate—Non-perishable and unspoiled perishable food can be donated to local food banks, soup kitchens, pantries, and shelters. Local and national programs frequently offer free pick-up and provide reusable containers to donors.

Read more: NRDC’s Food Waste Fact Sheet

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Americans, on average, throw away about 23 pounds of perfectly edible food, per person, every month.

A few simple guidelines can help you save money and cut down on the amount of food that’s wasted at home.

  1. Plan your meals for the week, and then buy only what you plan to cook.
  2. Make a shopping list, and stick to it.
  3. Check your cupboards before you go to the store, to avoid buying doubles.
  4. Understand that for many products, the “use by” and “best before” dates are simply manufacturer recommendations for peak quality, and are not an indicator of food safety. Very often foods—particularly dry goods—are fine long after the date on the package.  Trust your nose and common sense.

Read more: Tackling Food Waste at Home

Saturday, March 17, 2012
If the food’s not getting eaten… it’s not a good use of our resources. Dana Gunders, NRDC scientist, quoted in this CBS News piece reporting that an estimated 30 to 50 percent of the food produced globally goes to waste.

One way to reduce food waste is cook your own meals and cook those that you know well, which makes it easier to judge how much you need. For more tips on reducing waste around your home, see this Smarter Living article.

(Source: switchboard.nrdc.org)

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
About 1 million tons of CO2, 95 billion gallons of water, and $275 million will be thrown away this Thanksgiving in the form of leftover turkey. Please eat your leftovers this holiday season. (via NRDC’s Switchboard blog.)